Haslemere U3A

Last update 18 September 2018

MONTHLY MEETINGS

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Monthly meetings are held at 2.00-4.00pm on second Mondays in the Main hall.

Members and guests are welcome, but special meetings may be restricted.
Guests may come to any two meetings in the year before joining the U3A.

A fee of £2.00 is normally payable; this includes tea and biscuit.

Organised by Don Stacey (644423).

Click here for past meetings.

Date Subject Speaker
2018
8th October 2.00pm TBA
Lucy Allen has had to pull out.
Iain Kennedy
12th November 2.00pm AGM OF HASLEMERE U3A
followed by a Quiz.
The committee
2019
14th January 2.00pm Battle of the Atlantic and Ultra Code breaking in World War II
Having served in the Royal Navy for 30 years as an anti-submarine warfare specialist Jock retired in 1944 but continued to work as an historian for the Navy. During the Second World War, the longest conflict was the German attack on shipping, largely by submarines. A huge British achievement was Ultra, the decryption of German radio signals. In the years since its revelation in the 1970s it has become established in the public consciousness as the most important factor in the Battle of the Atlantic, as the struggle was dubbed by Churchill. Many books and films, such as Enigma by Robert Harris – a book made into a film – and the more recent The Imitation Game starring Benedict Cumberbatch, have reinforced the perception as Ultra being the most crucial – or even the only - factor. Many historians, too, have fallen into this trap. This subject will be explored in Jock’s talk revealing the many factors which led to the outcome and putting Ultra into a more balanced perspective.
Jock Gardner
11th February 2.00pm A Butler to Royalty
William started his career at the age of 16 when he joined the Royal Navy. His duties for the following 5 years while working on the Royal Yacht Britannia included service to the Queen, Prince Phillip and other members of the Royal family During his 25-year career as a butler, William has work with many VIP’s and has attained a high profile within the profession, enabling him to travel the world. William has been on television in the UK and included in newspaper articles promoting butlers in the UK. He feels privileged to have attained “Top London Butler” status among agencies to which he has been assigned.
William J French
11th March 2.00pm Life in the Tower of London
Following a career in the Army, which he joined at the age of 15, Alan was recruited to become a Yeoman Warder at Her Majesty’s Tower of London in 1998. He was promoted to Yeoman Sergeant and then Yeoman Gaoler. Alan, together with his wife Pat, who he married in 1974, tell us of their experiences of working in the Tower – Pat, with the Crown Jewels, and Alan, who subsequently achieved the position of Chief Yeoman in 2012.
Alan and Pat Kingshott
8th April No Meeting
13th May 2.00pm Turner and Impressionism
Allen, one of our members, has also worked as a volunteer at Petworth House for the last six years, giving talks and tours on the art collection there, the most important in the National Trust. He has made a detailed study of J.M.W. Turner and his work and will speak on this painter's links with Impressionism, displaying many paintings to illustrate his theme.
Allen Chubb
10th June 2.00pm Pub Names
This talk takes a look at the beginnings of the pub name and the stories behind the imagery on the sign, and how the signs developed. Tony will explain a selection of local names before opening up to a question and answer session.
Anthony Poulton Smith
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Click for meetings for earlier years: 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

Past meetings 2018

Date Subject Speaker
10th September 2.00pm Life in North Korea
Hanne, a widely travelled member of Woking U3A, recently founded their Travel Experience Group. Her visit to North Korea in 2013 forms the basis of her talk. Hanne was fascinated by the idea of visiting a country rarely visited by tourists, and the possibility of getting past their official news and propaganda and perhaps understanding the country and the people just a little better. In particular she hoped to discover whether the people loved or feared Kim Jung-un, the current leader, or perhaps a bit of both. The trip did not disappoint.
Hanne Stinson
June 11th 2.00pm Joe Lyons
Neville is a second-generation relative of Joe Lyons, who founded and ran the famous cafes and corner houses which were a feature of England for most of the 20th century. Neville is a historian and archivist for the family business. The talk that he gave explored the social history of one of England's most famous institutions. The presentation, with many archive photos, told a story which stretches from 1887 to 1998. It was a trip down memory lane for many people: memories of the Teashops; the Corner Houses; the Hotels; and of course the Nippy waitresses. The presentation included amusing anecdotes and some surprises as well. The presentation, with many archival photos, stretched from 1887 onwards, from the time when Joseph Lyons - a born entrepreneur but with no previous experience of the catering industry - set up a small catering company to the time when his company became the world's first food empire. As well as the many well-known catering outlets Joe Lyons often fed 15000 guests at Royal Garden Parties, managed a big wartime ordnance project and developed in-house the first business computer.
Neville Lyons
May 14th Grannies can do anything
Telling the story of racing across the Antarctic to the South Pole in 2009 against fit young men like Ben Fogle and James Cracknell, Tess explains how as pensioners she and her partner found having a really big reason for doing something can make impossible things possible.
Tess Burrows
March 12th Dr Livingstone I presume
Critically acclaimed author and public speaker Fran Sandham tells the remarkable story behind the famous meeting in Africa in 1871 between the two explorers Dr David Livingstone and Henry Morton Stanley; how their meeting proved to be literally the journalistic scoop of the century; the curious surrogate father-son relationship between Stanley and Livingstone, the widespread controversy and hostility Stanley faced on his return to Europe after finding Livingstone; why the meeting was such a sensational news story, and why Stanley's words became the most famous greeting in history.
Fran Sandham
February 12th Wey and Arun Canal
The history and current position of the Canal.
In 1816, The Wey & Arun Junction Canal opened to great fanfare, linking the Wey Navigation near Guildford to the south coast via the Arun Navigation. Conceived during the Napoleonic Wars, the Canal was intended to provide a safe, efficient route from London to Portsmouth to carry goods supplying the dockyards. In its heyday, the Canal did carry many tons of cargo but the end of the war with France, and the arrival of the railways, sounded the death knell for the Wey & Arun as a business, and by 1871 it was formally closed.
200 years after it opened, over 3,000 members and volunteers are working to reopen the Wey & Arun Canal for leisure. With your help we can achieve this seemingly impossible task, and already several miles of the Canal are in regular use by small boats, canoes, and the Trust's own trip boats.
Click here for their website.
Graeme Lewington
January 8th Behind the scenes at Chelsea
Drawing on his experience of designing and building medal-winning gardens at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, Chris gives an insight into how the show gardens are created.
Chris is a family man who has lived in Kent and East Sussex for most of his life. The South-East is very special to him. He has a passion for its natural habitat and plants and a thorough understanding of the vagaries of the terrain and soil. Two of his award-winning Chelsea gardens have been inspired by contrasting aspects of the area which are close to his heart.
Chris O'Donoghue

Click for meetings for earlier years: 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017